10 insights from science on fatherhood


fatherhood

Since people everywhere take dear outdated Dad out to brunch or be prepared to fire up the grill and give away the gifts, it’ s a lot of fun to sit down and find out what science has to say about fatherhood.

Whether you’ re a dad now or mean to be one someday, there’ s something to learn for everyone.


1) Do the dishes. It’s for your daughter: Dads who want their daughters in order to aspire to prestigious careers should make a point of handling more chores around the house. That’s the suggestion of a study released in the journal Psychological Technology, which concluded that when a father helps out a lot at home, his daughters are more likely to break out of the mould of traditionally female jobs plus instead seek more high-powered professions. Researchers at the University of Uk Columbia said they found that will girls raised in homes exactly where chores were shared evenly among both parents tended to have wider career goals.

2) Finally, a reason to eat brussel sprouts: It isn’t really just pregnant women who need to eat healthful for the benefit of their offspring, According to a study at McGill University within Canada. it’s important for prospective dads to load up on vegetables with folates, such as spinach, sprouts and broccoli, says a recent study based on mice. If a father’ s folic acid level is simply too low when he and his partner conceive, he may increase the risk the fact that child will have abnormalities. It’s long been recommended that women boost their folic acid level during pregnancy, and now, it may end up that men need to do the same just before trying to conceive.

3) And lay down off the fries: Here’s another reason dads should watch what they eat: Obese fathers may pass on genes that raise the risk of their offspring being obese, developing diabetes, or both. This is particularly true for their daughters, based on researchers at Ohio University. Keep in mind that the study was done with mice, but it did determine that male mice made obese on high-fat diet plans seemed to pass on alterations in genes that speed up or slow down metabolic process.

Full story at Smithsonian via Neatorama.

All about Dads.

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